Husro & Shirin
   A historical novel of love, Poetry, and war

 

    

 
Primary Contact:    Maryam Tabibzadeh / dreamsinpersia@yahoo.com / (919) 531-4590 

      Interview Q&A                           Husro & Shirin

   

                                     

 

 

Amazon: Order online by clicking here  

Dream Books: Order on line b y clicking here  

Barnes & Nobles: Order on line by clicking here

 

 Danger of love on YouTube

www.youtube.com/watch?v=5GBLQTLHO7M

July 29, 2014 -Uploaded by Tate

Book Trailer forMaryam Tabibzadeh, A atate Publishing Author

 

Interview with Carlonia Book  Beat hosts

Carlolina Book Beat|News and Views about written Word

http://carolinabookbeat.com/2015/01/09/the-latest-from-carolina-book-beat-85/

 

Other interviews with Maryam Tabibzadeh follows.

PageOneLit.com: Where did you grow up and was reading and writing a part

of your life? Who were your earliest influences and why?

Maryam Tabibzadeh:
grow up in the city of Darab in the province of Fars in

today's Iran. Yes, reading was my first love in life. I had    inherited the love of

reading and writing from my father. Both of my parents were good readers and

good examples to follow. My father subscribed all the available weekly

magazines and my parents read them often.

 

PageOneLit.com: Why do you write? 

Maryam Tabibzadeh:  I love to write. You wake up in the middle of the night

and have some thing in your chest and nothing calms you down but writing

about it.


PageOneLit.com: Who and/or what have been your biggest influences with

regard to your writing and why? 

Maryam Tabibzadeh: I give the credit to both my father, whose hand writing

and composition was the talk of his friends, and my Uncle, whose poems were

published in Iran's weekly magazines. My father and my uncle worked with me

on my writings, I remember distinctly one day when I was submerged in one

of the novels I was reading, that my father told me you can create the same

novel If you want to one day. I was eleven at the time. I thought about it and

then I started writing my first short story and took it to my school. I was so

pleased to see my school mates read it and passed it along. That was the beg-

inning of my writing. Ironically a generation later I got the same bout of encou-

ragement from a close family member. I was shy to write anything in English

since it is my second language. But my daughter, Sheila Mahoutchian, gave me

the courage to write, and she inspired the creation of this book. She painted a

picture of the day my book would be published and asked me how I felt about

it, as if it really happened. This inspiration was what stirred the creation of "

Persian Dreams" 




PageOneLit.com: Tell us about
"Persian Dreams." 

Maryam Tabibzadeh: Like American Gone with the Wind and Russian's War

and Peace;Persian Dreams combines the sweetness of romance with the bitter-

ness of revelation and war. This story is told from the unique perspective of a

woman between lands. It shows the inward nature and inside perspectives of

the people of Iran, specifically the women, leading up to and directly after the

revolution of 1978. This perspective is unique because we usually get a picture

of this from the outside, from the American or foreign point of view, but here

we see the situation from the inside. The historic lesson is only further enhan-

ced by the sweet romantic events of a family through three generations.

Based on mostly autobiographical events, this novel is both sweetly nostalgic

and simultaneous educational. It opens the door to the inner workings of Iran-

ians and their history, even while giving us pretty images and poetry to dance

on the frames of our minds. Its uniqueness lays in this duality.

 

PageOneLit.com: Where did the influence come from to write this book?   

Maryam Tabibzadeh: The story was always in my mind. I lived through it, I

had friends that lived through this, and I often listened to my father's and

grandmother generation's stories of the times that they lived through. This is

the story of Iranian's last 100 years, and what it has lived through to get to

where it is now. My idea was that if there was a way to record it, in the way of

a story, I could reach both the younger generation of Iranians in America, and

Americans themselves to educate them somehow on where we have come from

and what has led up to the current situation.

PageOneLit.com:  In "Persian Dreams" your plot spans one generation to the

next. As one reviewer says, 'Persian Dreams ' "...offers great insights into the

lives of women in this society and how the changes in the political climate have

affected women's lives and roles over the years."  How much research did you

have to do regarding Persia/Iran history to write "Persian Dreams"?  How did

you research?

Maryam Tabibzadeh: The study of history always attracted me and all my

years of living I am reading historical events. My home land history is very long

and tumultuous. I was reading frantically all the books I could find for the last

100 years. I also have read many different books which were written during

and after the revolution. My life in Iran and the two research papers I wrote

while I was a student in Pahlavi University all contributed to this work.  I also

read and translated several poems from the Persian Language and tailored

them to this book.  It took me three years of research and writing.   

 

PageOneLit.com: What did you as the writer learn from writing

"Persian Dreams?" 

Maryam Tabibzadeh:   Two things: That the first page is important and you

must find the right publisher. It does not   matter if you write a great story but

it does matter if you have a great agent. I also learn that there is much to

writing a book besides research, and writing. Promotions are the fun part. 

 

PageOneLit.com: In "Persian Dreams"  your plot covers a culture that has

gone through changes, but the past continues to inform the present. Discuss

these changes and the unchanging of cultural practices

Maryam Tabibzadeh: The women gained the rights to vote and wear what

they like. The arrival of the modern schools and the opportunity for women to

work in the work place about 50 years ago in the Iran's traditional culture and

then again the arrivals of revolution and the changes in the  modern society

created by the last ruler all contributed to the change in the cultural practices. 

I felt it was necessary to show the multitude of views on the matters that

shook the nation through some of the most important times leading up to and

directly after the Revolution. I wanted to show that Iran is not as one-dimen-

sional as people like to think. No country is really. Especially during a period of

political unrest, many varying view points exist around what is happening

during these tumultuous times. The differences in characters show us all the

different experiences that were present throughout these times. The characters

express experiences that women underwent, characters that men had to deal

with, that young people had to deal with, in regard to all the pride of their

parents and the culture of their people. The characters themselves tell a story

that has long gone untold.



PageOneLit.com: Discuss the women in "Persian Dreams" and how they must

struggle to find their place in Islam but still be free to find/follow their own

dreams. 

Maryam Tabibzadeh: It depends on the woman's dreams and the country in

which they are living. For Noosha, she was able to achieve her dreams and

have a place in a Islamic country since her dreams was to continue her higher

education and earn her living by working. This is not against Islam so there

was no contradiction between the two. However if a woman's dream is to be

equal to men which Islam obviously prohibits then there is no way to have

both. I can not wear what I like to wear as a woman and have a place in Islam

it is impossible. Of course, there are so many different issues which have the

same nature.




PageOneLit.com:  "Persian Dreams"   is 'well paced' Which part of the writing

process do you have the most difficulty  -- Plot or  Character? 

Maryam Tabibzadeh: I think the plot was the hardest part. I did not know to

choose the plot style similar to the fairy tales as Old Persian way of writing or

write the events as a flashback. Finally I chose the fairy tale to go with the

name. 



PageOneLit.com: What do you hope readers walk away with after reading

Persian Dreams" ?

Maryam Tabibzadeh: I hope that they will be enchanted. The story carries

along in that meandering way that folklore storytellers are famous for, the

images and characters have a cinema graphic quality to them. One feels

uplifted by the victories and crushed by the terrible circumstances and drama

that the characters undergo. We share their pain and anxieties, we identify

with their various situations.  

In short, I believe that readers will be quite touched by the simple and honest

language of this endearing tale of trial and tribulation of a people under a

shifting and unsteady political landscape.



PageOneLit.com: "Persian Dreams" would make a great film -- Anything in

the works? Who in Hollywood would you select to play your characters?

Maryam Tabibzadeh: Not yet. I think Susan Sarandon and Sam Sheppard

would be good candidates or Indeed I've thought a great deal about the actors

who would play the major roles. I have given this much thought. Here are my

suggestions: John Robis Annette Benning, Sir William Kevin Bacon, Master

Weaver Isaac Peter Falk, Lady RosalieIsabella Rossellini, Dr. Evelyn Thayer

Sigourney Weaver, The FoolDanny Devito, Sir Clarence DudleyJohn Lithgow,

Sister AgathaKathy Bates, Sir Jeremiah HuffMorgan Freeman, Archbishop

ClaudeRon Perlman, Troubadour Johnny Depp, Seer Delphine Cloris Leachman.

 


PageOneLit.com: You have written short stories and poems as well -- Is

there a literary genre/form you prefer? As a writer/author discuss each form

Poetry -Short Story - Novel from your point of view and what each form gives

back to you - Is there one genre you enjoy than the other? Why or Why not?

Maryam Tabibzadeh: I think poetry is harder to write than short stories or the

novel. I can write them only when I am feeling a deep passion for something

very important in my life, however poetry and short story are one dimensional

and it is written quickly and often does not need any research. For Novel you

need to have some knowledge and some information about your subject to

write about.  Yes, I prefer a short story. This gives my diverse idea a chance

to wonder around. It is quick. I see or feel something and that is enough to

write them in the form of short story. Short stories also does not need the

intense feeling the poetry need to have so it gets created easily and effortlessly.




PageOneLit.com: What's next?

Maryam Tabibzadeh: I have hundred ideas and am working on them. One is

the work of a great poet that I love and like to translate his poems into English

. The other is another Novel which is about a western woman in the west with

traditional ideas and her reaction to her children's choices of homosexuality

and interracial marriage. I have the idea and doing research on it.


PageOneLit.com: What was the last book you read?

Maryam Tabibzadeh: I read a lot but the last books were Dan Brown's

Da vinci Code  to see what made this book so popular. I also read  Shirin

Ebadi's  Iran Awakening




PageOneLit.com: Do you have any hobbies? What are they? How do they

enhance your writing? 

 Maryam Tabibzadeh: Beside writing I love reading and gardening. Reading

gives me the scope and information for my mind to develop my new writing

projects and gardening is a tool to purify my soul and make me ready to write.
 

 

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Q/A with Maryam Tabibzadeh Posted on Tuesday, May 09 @ 10:57:52 PDT by ashena Magazine:

Ashena: What was your goal in writing this book?
Maryam : I want the world to know what we as a nation have suffered from the changes that Iran has 

experienced in the last 30 years. I wanted to show the story from the inside, from the belly within. I believe

that we as a nation have suffered more than any other nation from this inner turbulence, and that this

information isn’t finding its way to the public in the right ways.

But more than this, and more than anything, I want our second-generation Iranian youth, the young adults

that now live here to know where they come from, how we got here, that we have good and bad within the

course of historic events. They need to know that we have a civilized past, but that we also have much that

needs to be changed in the future. Armed with this knowledge, they may be able to step up and be

instrumental in the process of these changes.

 

Ashena:Where did you get the idea for your book?
Maryam : The story was always in my mind. I lived through it, I had friends that lived through this, and

I often listened to my father’s and grandmother’s stories of the times that they lived through. This is the story

of Iran’s last 100 years, and what it has lived through to get to where it is now. My idea was that if there was

a way to record it, in the way of a story, I could reach both the younger generation of Iranians in America, and

Americans themselves to educate them somehow on where we come from and what has led up to the current

situation.

 

Ashena:What inspired you to create characters that are so different from each other? Are they based

on people you know or composites?

Maryam : Many of the characters are based on people I encountered along the way in real life. I have

made this book a fiction to protect their identities and to allow some freedom in expressing the course of

events as I experienced them. But in addition to this, I felt it was necessary to show the multitude of views

on the matters that shook the nation through some of the most important times leading up to and directly

after the Revolution. I wanted to show that Iran is not as one-dimensional as people like to think, no country

is really, and especially during a period of political unrest, many varying view points exist around what is

happening during these kinds of tumultuous times. The differences in characters show us all the different

experiences that were present throughout all of these times. They express to us experiences that women

underwent, that men had to deal with, that young people had to deal with, with regard to all the pride of

their parents and the culture of their people. The characters themselves tell a story that has long gone

untold.

 

Ashena:Do you think a lot of young females in Iran are like Nosha, who is unwilling to be debased by her

government and the society in which she lives?
Maryam : Nosha represents an ideology in women that was brought about by the westernization efforts

of Mohamad Reza Shah, and this ideology still exists strongly in the mothers of the young women that you

mention here. I would argue that these young women are even stronger and more aggressive than their

mothers, because Nosha’s generation fought very hard to achieve certain freedoms and rights, and are not

going to give up simply because the laws have changed.

 

Ashena:When you discuss the rumblings before the revolution, you have a detailed account of what

many in the nation were probably thinking at that time. Did you remember all that from your own

experience?

Maryam : Yes, I drew a lot from my own memories and experiences, and that of those who were close

to me at the time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 
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